Survivors Organizing for Liberation (SOL)

Survivors Organizing for Liberation (SOL) and Buried Seedz of Resistance envisions a Colorado where Transgender, Gender non-conforming, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Two Spirit and Queer people have the power to determine the conditions of their lives, are valued for who they are, take responsibility for each other’s safety, and live their lives free from violence.

Survivors Organizing for Liberation (SOL) and Buried Seedz of Resistance envisions a Colorado where Transgender, Gender non-conforming, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Two Spirit and Queer people have the power to determine the conditions of their lives, are valued for who they are, take responsibility for each other’s safety, and live their lives free from violence. SOL|BSeedz operates a 24-hour statewide hotline for community members who have experienced or witnessed violence as a strategy to empower callers to join the “healing collective” and become active members of bringing safety and wellness into our communities. SOL|BSeedz has been actively responding to the murder of Jessie Hernandez, a young queer Latina murdered by the Denver Police Department, and works with community members to respond to ongoing police violence.

FIERCE

FIERCE! is a community organizing project for Transgender, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Two Spirit, Queer, and Questioning (TLGBTSQQ) youth of color in New York City.

FIERCE! is a community organizing project for Transgender, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Two Spirit, Queer, and Questioning (TLGBTSQQ) youth of color in New York City. FIERCE is dedicated to exploring and building power in these communities through a mix of leadership development, artistic and cultural activism, political education, and campaign development. FIERCE challenges the institutions that perpetuate transphobia, homophobia, racism, ethnic conflict, gender bias, economic injustice, ageism, and the spread of HIV, STIs, STDs, and other mental and physical health crises, and organizes against the injustices of the criminal “justice” system, housing, employment, education, and healthcare systems.

Transgender, Gender Variant, and Intersex Justice Project

TGIJP was founded in 2004 with the mission to challenge and end human rights abuses against transgender, gender variant and intersex people, especially transgender women, in California prisons and beyond.

TGIJP was founded in 2004 with the mission to challenge and end human rights abuses against transgender, gender variant and intersex people, especially transgender women, in California prisons and beyond. While TGIJP has done some legal work for intersex individuals caught within the prison industrial complex, its leadership team has long wanted to expand its work in this area to fully realize its name and mission. In 2014, an intersex individual joined the TGIJP’s core volunteer team. TGIJP is now working to increase the visibility of intersex issues in their current programming (e.g. publishing information in their newsletter and raising intersex issues with current allies); conducting internal education for staff, core leadership and members; developing collaborative relationships with intersex organizations; and conducting outreach to identify imprisoned intersex people, share information and support their ability to self-advocate and self-organize. Check out our 2018 International Trans Day of Visibility video featuring an interview with TGIJP’s former Executive Director, Miss Major: Learn more about the documentary 2015 Global Arts Fund grantee partner Annalise Ophelian made about Miss Major:

Forum for the Empowerment of Women (FEW)

Established in 2002, Forum for the Empowerment of Women (FEW) is a black lesbian feminist organization that engages in advocacy, education and action.

Established in 2002, Forum for the Empowerment of Women (FEW) is a black lesbian feminist organization that engages in advocacy, education and action to ensure that black lesbians enjoy holistic freedom, wellness, dignity and bodily autonomy in all aspects of their lives. FEW is currently focused on building the Rainbow Activist Alliance (RAA), a network of 15 community based LGBTI organizations in several provinces across South Africa, collectively working to create safer communities, ensure access to appropriate public health care, ensure non-discrimination within the criminal justice system, and build black lesbian leadership. While the issue of pervasive violence against Black lesbians in South Africa has seen a increased visibility over quite a period of time, black lesbians and gender non-conforming people continue to face heightened level of violence, discrimination, marginalization and exclusion. FEW’s cultural activism, direct action and advocacy builds pressure for state accountability for this violence.

Community United Against Violence, Inc. (CUAV)

CUAV is a 37 year-old community organization. Their current programs seek to build the wellness, leadership, and collective power of low- and no-income LGBTQ people of color who are surviving the brunt of violence, poverty, and criminalization.

CUAV is a 37 year-old community organization. Their current programs seek to build the wellness, leadership, and collective power of low- and no-income LGBTQ people of color who are surviving the brunt of violence, poverty, and criminalization. CUAV believes that systemic unemployment and disproportionate interaction with criminal legal and immigration enforcement systems are major issues facing their community, and that these issues produce long standing trauma, barriers to stable housing and healthcare, isolation, violence, and premature death. Their approach is a holistic one and aims to create safety. Their goals are to strengthen the wellness of low- and no-income LGBTQ people surviving domestic violence and hate violence; increase the capacity of low- and no-income LGBTQ survivors of violence and abuse to create healthy relationships and safer lives; and transform the root causes of violence through culture change activities and policy campaigns on issues such as immigration. CUAV is leading a multi-movement coalition against the expansion of the San Francisco Jail.

Southerners on New Ground (SONG)

Formed in 1993 and led primarily by queer women and people of color in the South, SONG is a movement-building leader.

Formed in 1993 and led primarily by queer women and people of color in the South, SONG is a movement-building leader nationally that works with a strong intersectional racial, gender and economic justice politic. SONG’s Free from Fear campaign strategy is working to politicize, engage, and activate LGBTQ people to lead migrant justice and anti-criminalization campaigns in the South, contributing their leadership, base and LGBTQ analysis. SONG has also contributed to key migrant justice campaigns in the South over the past several years, including active leadership in the Southeast Immigrant Rights Network and the Georgia Not1More campaign.

Audre Lorde Project (ALP)

Audre Lorde Project (ALP) is a Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Two Spirit, Trans and Gender Non Conforming (LGBTSTGNC) People of Color (POC) center for community organizing, focusing on the NYC area.

Audre Lorde Project (ALP) is a Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Two Spirit, Trans and Gender Non Conforming (LGBTSTGNC) People of Color (POC) center for community organizing, focusing on the NYC area. ALP’s programs include: Safe Outside the System which builds community-led models of safety in response to increased violence targeting LGBTSTGNC POC; 3rd Space Program which provides resources and referrals for members, centering survival, wellness and resiliency strategies; Membership which builds ALP’s base by developing leadership among its membership; and TransJustice which builds leadership and political strategies for the visibility and livelihood of TGNC POC.