EuroCentralAsian Lesbian* Community (EL*C)

The Eurocentralasian Lesbian* Community – EL*C is a lesbian feminist and intersectional network that works for the well-being of lesbians throughout Europe and Central Asia.

The Eurocentralasian Lesbian* Community – EL*C is a lesbian feminist and intersectional network. The EL*C started out of a self-organised space three years ago, recognizing the multitude of needs surrounding the rights, the visibility and the well-being of lesbians throughout Europe and Central Asia. Our conferences are our lighthouses – shaping connections, sharing knowledge, finding common languages and understandings of our diversities, building bridges that reach and impact far beyond the time and space at which they take place.

Caribeñxs

Convocar y organizar mujeres lesbianas, bisexuales, pansexuales, trans y otras identidades no hegemónicas que se enuncien desde los feminismos de la ciudad de Montería y el departamento de Córdoba, para aportar a la transformación de las violencias estructurales basadas en género y por prejuicio hacia las identidades sexo/género diversas, desde a visibilización, incidencia política, el reconocimiento y divulgación de derechos, a través de escenarios de formación comunitaria en teorías de género y artes, intercambio de experiencias y la generación de una agenda pública cultural feminista.

Ahwaa

Ahwaa’s vision is to serve as the primary resource for the Arab LGBTQI+ community: a platform to organize, obtain and receive support in a secure and engaging environment.

Ahwaa’s vision is to serve as the primary resource for the Arab LGBTQI+ community: a platform to organize, obtain and receive support in a secure and engaging environment. Ahwaa will assist local LGBTQI+ organizations and grassroots movements in connecting with their target stakeholders, ensuring that our community has a trusted partner online for safety, urgent support, and kinship.

National Network of Abortion Funds

The National Network of Abortion Funds builds power with members to remove financial and logistical barriers to abortion access by centering people who have abortions and organizing at the intersections of racial, economic, and reproductive justice.

The National Network of Abortion Funds builds power with members to remove financial and logistical barriers to abortion access by centering people who have abortions and organizing at the intersections of racial, economic, and reproductive justice.

Mujer y Mujer

Mujer Y Mujer pushes the traditional meaning of “woman.”

Mujer Y Mujer was created in 2003 to challenge the social and political visibility of lesbian women, united by the vital need to build community, develop leadership and influence against a backdrop of violence, discrimination and privatization of both public spaces as the body and sexuality of women. Mujer Y Mujer pushes the traditional meaning of “woman.” Since 2009 they’ve championed the leadership of bisexual women and transgender people. They also celebrate ethnic and generational diversity while their community initiatives strengthen the working class. The organization is run by volunteers due to lack of resources for LGBT groups in Guayaquil and LBT activism in particular. They strategically promote the creative role of women and LGBTI + in the integral development of more just and equitable societies; enhancing their political voices from their desires and resistances. Their slogan: Free to Be, Decide and Demand, represents the 3 axes of their philosophy.

MediaJustice (formerly Center for Media Justice)

The Center for Media Justice fights for racial and economic justice in a digital age by advancing communication rights, access, and power for all communities harmed by persistent inequality and oppression.

The MediaJustice (formerly the Center for Media Justice) fights for racial and economic justice in a digital age by advancing communication rights, access, and power for all communities harmed by persistent inequality and oppression. Launched in 2009, MediaJustice envisions a future where under-represented communities have the power to create the media and communications environment they need to win justice in a changing world. The MediaJustice recognizes that inadequate access to communication technologies speeds up and worsens racial discrimination, expands the carceral state and surveillance structures, and further criminalizes Black, migrant, indigenous, LGBTQI, and low-income communities. Centering the power of narrative within movements for racial and economic justice, MediaJustice houses the Media Action Grassroots Network (MAG-Net): the largest formation of constituency-based organizations that collaborates for communication rights, access, and power. Since 2008, MAG-Net members have successfully collaborated with partners across movements to win open internet protections, reduce interstate prison phone rates, block destructive corporate media mergers, and modernize low-income Lifeline programs that connect millions of low-income households to faster broadband service.

Black LGBTQIA+ Migrant Project

Launched in December of 2017, the Black LGBTQIA+ Migrant Project formed in response to the invisibilization of Black LGBTQIA migrants’ experiences of being undocumented, queer, and Black within migrant narratives, immigration justice, and racial justice movements.

Launched in December of 2017, the Black LGBTQIA+ Migrant Project formed in response to the invisibilization of Black LGBTQIA migrants’ experiences of being undocumented, queer, and Black within migrant narratives, immigration justice, and racial justice movements. BLMP recognizes that their community lives in a space where racism, xenophobia, misogyny, trans/homophobia, policing, detention & deportation, and criminalization uniquely targets the daily life, wellness, and safety of queer and trans Black migrants. They envision a world where all Black LGBTQIA migrants and their loved ones have housing, bodily autonomy, health and the ability to travel freely with dignity and safety. Working at the local, regional, and national level to face multifaceted & intensifying attacks on their communities, they organize community and movement building events around the country to reduce isolation, create support systems for trans and queer Black migrants, and build leadership and local power to defend Black LGBTQIA+ communities. Comprised of and led by an intergenerational yet mostly youth steering committee of  13 queer, trans, women, undocumented/under-documented, and 1st generation migrants, and with three network-leads in California, D.C., and Houston, BLMP is leading trainings and community gatherings throughout the US South, West, Midwest and Northeast; in particular, with trainings focused on transformative community organizing, healing practices to address trauma, and know your rights trainings when dealing with police and ICE. View their mini documentary: https://youtu.be/hmyvvc91BCs

SPARK Reproductive Justice Now

SPARK envisions a future where communities in Georgia and the South have resources and power to make sustainable and liberatory decisions about their bodies, gender, sexualities, and lives.

SPARK envisions a future where communities in Georgia and the South have resources and power to make sustainable and liberatory decisions about their bodies, gender, sexualities, and lives. Based in Atlanta, SPARK aims to queer the Reproductive Justice movement and uplift people of color living in the Trans experience. Successfully bringing a racial justice and queer liberation framework to the reproductive justice movement in Georgia and the Southeast, they believe that the Queer and Trans youth of color living in the South have a unique experience of reproductive violence, and body and gender oppression. In particular, this requires them to go beyond the traditional focus of access to abortion and contraception. Working with communities that face daily obstacles of homelessness, displacement, poverty, immigration surveillance and detention, inaccessible health care and inadequate health insurance, and stigma against people living with HIV, SPARK creatively uses collective action, policy advocacy, leadership development to create impact and empower their base.

Communities United for Police Reform (CPR)

Communities United for Police Reform (CPR) launched as a campaign in 2012 after long-time New York City grassroots organizers saw the need to build a comprehensive multi-sector coalition.

Communities United for Police Reform (CPR) launched in 2012 after long-time New York City grassroots organizers saw the need to build a comprehensive multi-sector campaign to end discriminatory and abusive policing. CPR itself is comprised of over 70 member organizations and runs coalitions of up to 200+ groups to win campaigns that strengthen community infrastructure and promote racial justice and community safety, while holding police accountable for respecting the rights and dignity of all. In spite of the decrease in reported street stops in NYC, “Broken-windows” and other abusive policing continues to target low-income communities of color, particularly immigrants, young people, homeless, public housing residents, LGBTQ and gender nonconforming people, women, and people with disabilities.

Opposing the current lack of transparency and accountability within the NYPD, and the disproportionate amount of resources spent on policing, CPR envisions a transformed New York City where safety does not rely on criminalization policies or come at the expense of human rights, but instead supports community infrastructure through affordable housing, quality education and healthcare, youth services, and living wage employment opportunities.