Forum for the Empowerment of Women (FEW)

Established in 2002, Forum for the Empowerment of Women (FEW) is a black lesbian feminist organization that engages in advocacy, education and action.

Established in 2002, Forum for the Empowerment of Women (FEW) is a black lesbian feminist organization that engages in advocacy, education and action to ensure that black lesbians enjoy holistic freedom, wellness, dignity and bodily autonomy in all aspects of their lives. FEW is currently focused on building the Rainbow Activist Alliance (RAA), a network of 15 community based LGBTI organizations in several provinces across South Africa, collectively working to create safer communities, ensure access to appropriate public health care, ensure non-discrimination within the criminal justice system, and build black lesbian leadership. While the issue of pervasive violence against Black lesbians in South Africa has seen a increased visibility over quite a period of time, black lesbians and gender non-conforming people continue to face heightened level of violence, discrimination, marginalization and exclusion. FEW’s cultural activism, direct action and advocacy builds pressure for state accountability for this violence.

Creating Resources for Empowerment in Action (CREA)

CREA is a Global-South-based international feminist human rights organization formed in 1999 by a group of development professionals working in the human rights.

CREA is a Global-South-based international feminist human rights organization formed in 1999 by a group of development professionals working in the fields of reproductive rights, sexuality, violence against women, media and women’s human rights. Together with partners from a diverse range of human rights movements and networks, CREA works to build feminist leadership, advance the rights of women and girls, and the sexual and reproductive freedoms of all people. CREA currently plans to pursue targeted public education activities to reduce stigma and discrimination against LGBTI people over the next three years. They are building on recent success last year where they provided planning and training support to a pioneering student program called “Breaking Barriers” at the Tagore International School, which won first prize in a National Youth Leader competition and garnered significant positive media coverage. CREA also organized debates in colleges on issues of gender and sexuality, and ran an online campaign with Youth Ki Awaaz, which reached over a half a million people.

Mujeres Y Cultura Subterránea, A.C.

MyCS works with youth who live on the streets, LBT women, girls, sex workers and street vendors, and supports them to empower others and foster their own leadership.

Mujeres y Cultura Subterránea (MyCS) is a grassroots community organization led by poor and marginalized self-identified lesbians in Mexico City, a stigmatized urban area of Mexico City. MyCS works with youth who live on the streets, LBT women, girls, sex workers and street vendors, and supports them to empower others and foster their own leadership through self-esteem workshops, human rights workshops and documentary projects. Its goal is to create a world where sexism and lesbophobia are nonexistent, through the arts and cultural activism, the fight for alternative poetry, music, culture, and the protection of the human rights of their communities.

*** En Español***

Mujeres y Cultura Subterránea (MyCS) es una organización comunitaria de base liderada por lesbianas autodenominadas pobres y marginales en Chimalhuacán, un área urbana y estigmatizada de la Ciudad de México. MyCS trabaja con juventud que vive en las calles, mujeres LBT, niñxs, trabajadorxs sexuales y mujeres vendedoras en las calles y les apoya para que se empoderen unxs a otrxs y fomenten su propio liderazgo a través de talleres de autoestima, talleres de derechos humanos y proyectos de documentales. Su meta es crear un mundo donde el sexismo y la lesbofobia sean inexistentes, a través de las artes y el activismo cultural; el rescate de la poesía, la música y la cultura alternativas; y la protección de los derechos humanos de sus comunidades.

Affinity Community Services

Affinity is a social justice organization that works with and on behalf of Black LGBTQ communities, queer youth, and allies.

Affinity is a social justice organization that works with and on behalf of Black LGBTQ communities, queer youth, and allies to identify needs, create safe spaces, develop leaders, and bridge communities through collective analysis and action for social justice, freedom, and human rights. Affinity works in three intersecting areas: access to wellness, community engagement, and leadership development. Their Building Bridges initiative brings the gifts of Black LGBTQ Americans into the immigration reform movement and builds long-term solidarity with other communities of color in Chicago. They aim to increase the knowledge of constituents and allies about public policy, increase participation in advocacy and community organizing, and increase multi-identity collaborations in Chicago.

This organization is supported through the Funding Queerly Giving Circle, which is housed at Astraea.

Audre Lorde Project (ALP)

Audre Lorde Project (ALP) is a Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Two Spirit, Trans and Gender Non Conforming (LGBTSTGNC) People of Color (POC) center for community organizing, focusing on the NYC area.

Audre Lorde Project (ALP) is a Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Two Spirit, Trans and Gender Non Conforming (LGBTSTGNC) People of Color (POC) center for community organizing, focusing on the NYC area. ALP’s programs include: Safe Outside the System which builds community-led models of safety in response to increased violence targeting LGBTSTGNC POC; 3rd Space Program which provides resources and referrals for members, centering survival, wellness and resiliency strategies; Membership which builds ALP’s base by developing leadership among its membership; and TransJustice which builds leadership and political strategies for the visibility and livelihood of TGNC POC.

Community United Against Violence, Inc. (CUAV)

CUAV is a 37 year-old community organization. Their current programs seek to build the wellness, leadership, and collective power of low- and no-income LGBTQ people of color who are surviving the brunt of violence, poverty, and criminalization.

CUAV is a 37 year-old community organization. Their current programs seek to build the wellness, leadership, and collective power of low- and no-income LGBTQ people of color who are surviving the brunt of violence, poverty, and criminalization. CUAV believes that systemic unemployment and disproportionate interaction with criminal legal and immigration enforcement systems are major issues facing their community, and that these issues produce long standing trauma, barriers to stable housing and healthcare, isolation, violence, and premature death. Their approach is a holistic one and aims to create safety. Their goals are to strengthen the wellness of low- and no-income LGBTQ people surviving domestic violence and hate violence; increase the capacity of low- and no-income LGBTQ survivors of violence and abuse to create healthy relationships and safer lives; and transform the root causes of violence through culture change activities and policy campaigns on issues such as immigration. CUAV is leading a multi-movement coalition against the expansion of the San Francisco Jail.

Southerners on New Ground (SONG)

Formed in 1993 and led primarily by queer women and people of color in the South, SONG is a movement-building leader.

Formed in 1993 and led primarily by queer women and people of color in the South, SONG is a movement-building leader nationally that works with a strong intersectional racial, gender and economic justice politic. SONG’s Free from Fear campaign strategy is working to politicize, engage, and activate LGBTQ people to lead migrant justice and anti-criminalization campaigns in the South, contributing their leadership, base and LGBTQ analysis. SONG has also contributed to key migrant justice campaigns in the South over the past several years, including active leadership in the Southeast Immigrant Rights Network and the Georgia Not1More campaign.

allgo

allgo is a 31-year-old organization that works toward its vision of a just and equitable society that celebrates and nurtures vibrant people of color queer cultures.

allgo is a 31-year-old organization that works toward its vision of a just and equitable society that celebrates and nurtures vibrant people of color queer cultures. To this end, allgo carries out cultural arts, health and advocacy programming. For example, they completed a project to uncover the needs of trans and queer youth in correctional facilities and conducted national and statewide trainings for youth correctional facilities staff on youth safety and protection from sexual violence. Additionally, allgo mobilized efforts for the release of the “San Antonio Four”, four Latina lesbians wrongfully convicted and imprisoned for more than 15 years due to racial and LGBTQ discrimination. allgo’s goals include holding a QPOC Activist Leadership Summit, carrying out local and statewide efforts on immigration and worker’s rights, and continuing the ongoing task of grassroots basebuilding. This organization is supported through the Funding Queerly Giving Circle, which is housed at Astraea.