The Right-Wing Is Weaponizing Gender Panic by J. Bob Alotta

Around the globe, conservative forces are using the “gender ideology” movement to score all kinds of victories.

By J. Bob Alotta, Astraea Executive Director, published in The Advocate

The Trump Administration’s leaked gender memo, the recent transgender military ban, and the expansion of the global gag rule aren’t coincidences. They are part of a well-coordinated, funded global movement designed to control our communities by restricting the rights and bodily autonomy of women, LGBTQI communities, and people of color — eerily reminiscent of Reagan era oppressive tactics.

For LGBTQI communities, this kind of backlash is not new. At the height of the AIDS epidemic, the Reagan administration demonized our communities, as did right-wing forces around the world, spreading the false notion of the “gay plague” and blaming men who have sex with men for the transmission of the HIV virus. LGBT people were denied equal access to healthcare, faced intense violence, were stigmatized, stripped of basic rights, and often forced into the shadows. But we fought back.

Today, we know the far-right are sewing those same seeds of paranoia, creating gender panic with the use of an intentionally ambiguous organizing framework termed “gender ideology”by some and “anti-gender ideology” by others. Originating in the 1990s, gender ideology is a construct that depicts efforts to expand rights for women, LGBTQI people, and people of color, as radical, dangerous, and elitist, arguing that we are a threat to traditional family values.

What we have been less aware of is that this gender ideology movement is extremely well-funded, and well-organized across sectors and regions. While we don’t have a comprehensive map of the funding of these movements, we know the size and scope is significant…

Read the full article via The Advocate.

Pride 2019: Astraea T-Shirts

To celebrate the radical roots of Pride and our commitment to the sustainability of grassroots movements for justice, Astraea has worked with the artist Amir Khadar to design three new t-shirts. All proceeds will support Astraea’s mission to resource LGBTQI grassroots activism in the U.S. and around the world.

To celebrate the radical roots of Pride and our commitment to the sustainability of grassroots movements for justice, Astraea has worked with the artist Amir Khadar to design three new t-shirts. To order shirts of your own, follow the links below! All proceeds will support Astraea’s mission to resource LGBTQI grassroots activism in the U.S. and around the world.

Healing Is Justice

Healing Justice is a framework for prioritizing and uplifting the sustainability practices of communities that are marginalized, objectified, and policed by the state and institutions to address the impact of violence and trauma. At the Astraea Foundation, we believe that healing IS justice, an integral part of activist work for communities facing systems of oppression. Buy your Healing Is Justice t-shirt here!

Queer Liberation

In Pride Month and beyond, it’s important to uplift and honor the roots the communities without whom Pride would not exist–queer and trans People of Color, sex workers, and more. Our new Queer Liberation t-shirt honors those roots with important symbols of queer and trans resistance–a red umbrella for sex workers’ rights, a brick for the Stonewall Riots, and roses for Trans Day of Remembrance. Buy your Queer Liberation t-shirt here!

#QueerLiberationNotRainbowCapitalism

In Pride Month and beyond, Astraea is committed to engaging around the problematic politics of corporate pride, rather than being complicit or silent around these issues. We say yes to queer liberation and not to rainbow capitalism. Help us redirect money and energy from rainbow capitalism to people-of-color-led organizations striving for justice with a #QueerLiberationNotRainbowCapitalism t-shirt. Buy your #QueerLiberationNotRainbowCapitalism shirt here!

Astraea Envisions Queer Liberation: Pride Month 2019

We want a Pride Month that is truly inclusive and leans into the LGBTQI grassroots visions for where our movements are headed. We’re holding both the accomplishments we are proud of, as well as shining a spotlight on the many political, social, and cultural battles still ongoing around the world.

What we say NO to!

  • NO policing of LGBTQI bodies
  • NO rainbow capitalism
  • NO normalizing of white gay cis identity at the expense of Black and Brown LBQTI folks
  • NO depoliticization of our causes
  • NO homogenization of our identities and struggles
  • NO exclusion of bi/pan, asexual, intersex, trans, and others

From the time of Stonewall, LGBTQ patrons of the Stonewall Inn—fed up with being harassed and targeted, who were predominantly People of Color—fought back against the police. Today, we know that Pride activities and marches in many parts of the United States and around the world are still spaces of resistance. Oftentimes, these spaces and the LGBTQI people who participate in them are criminalized, discriminated against and/or face violence and backlash.

Pride marches often include a heavy police presence, which can be triggering and unsafe, particularly for QTPOC. Police and law enforcement have a history of violence against LGBTQI communities, which continues into the present in many contexts, making Pride marches violent and dangerous for some members of the LGBTQ community.

Putting Pride in the context of remembering Stonewall 50 years on, we acknowledge this is a year where in the U.S anti-LGBTQI violence is escalating, particularly the anti-trans actions introduced—from trying to ban trans people from the military, to rescinding Obama-era memos that protected trans workers and students from discrimination. Just as of June 15, 2019, four trans women have been reported murdered during this Pride Month, and at least 10 have been reported murdered overall in 2019.

What we say YES to!

  • We want a Pride that is truly inclusive and leans into the LGBTQI grassroots visions for where our movements are headed. We’re holding both the accomplishments we are proud of, as well as shining a spotlight on the many political, social, and cultural battles still ongoing around the world.
  • We commit to engaging around the problematic politics of corporate Pride rather than being complicit or silent around these issues. We say yes to queer liberation and not rainbow capitalism.
  • We take care of and are joyous in our communities, while we keep fighting for justice. LGBTQI grassroots activism has always combined struggle with celebration. Pride can and should be both celebratory and healing, and heavy and political.
  • We call for a Pride that is centered around highlighting and protecting self-determination, bodily autonomy, gender justice, diverse gender identities and sexualities, and rejecting violence, discrimination, and gender-based oppression. We see our role as uplifting the tremendous work of our grantee partners, and the work that we are proud of having done.
  • We acknowledge that as a philanthropic institution with power and resources, we have a particular responsibility to amplify those communities who are not always heard during Pride month or at all, as well as to call out efforts to corporatize and homonormalize Pride.
  • We uplift Pride actions around the world that are truly radical, political and liberatory. Some examples include: Annual NYC Dyke March // Trans Day of Action // Queer Liberation March // Soweto Pride

What we’re PROUD of:

  • Our 40+ year history of resistance through lesbian feminist philanthropy— read our Feminist Funding Principles here
  • Supporting grassroots organizations and leadership around the world that center LGBTQI people
  • Our commitment to centering the leadership of queer, trans, & GNC People of Color in the U.S.—over 99% of our grantee partner organizations in the U.S. are POC-led
  • Healing Justice practices as a response to generational trauma, policing, and surveillance—read our Healing Justice Report here
  • Uplifiting queer digital activism and holistic security for organizers and activists
  • Our overt support of intersex activism and global local organizing—read more about our Intersex Human Rights Fund here

SOME RESOURCES

#AstraeaPride 2019 Videos:

U.S. Fund:

The U.S. Fund is Astraea’s longest-standing fund, working for racial, gender, economic, migrant and reproductive justice and centering the leadership of queer, trans and GNC People of Color in the U.S. For #Pride2019, we’re celebrating the U.S. Fund and all we’ve accomplished through the Fund so far. Read more about it: buff.ly/2Z7E6h8

LGBTQI Digital Activism:

Astraea believes in the power of digital LGBTQI-led activism. For #Pride2019, we’re highlighting some of the ways we’ve recently supported digital activism in Eastern Europe and Central Asia.

Farewell but not goodbye – A letter from Astraea’s Executive Director, J. Bob Alotta

“Today, after eight years, I am announcing I will be transitioning out of my role as the Executive Director of the Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice. While it is a move I do not make lightly, I do so with the full support of the board and the incredible staff of Astraea.” – J. Bob Alotta

Today, after eight years, I am announcing I will be transitioning out of my role as the Executive Director of the Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice. While it is a move I do not make lightly, I do so with the full support of the board and the incredible staff of Astraea.

Astraea is and will ever be an entity of enormous transformation and purpose. As only the second Executive Director in an over 40-year herstory, I have had the incredible honor of evoking the anchor of lesbian feminism bestowed on us by our founding mothers, while building a future-forward organization that has now granted over $40 million dollars to LGBTQI grassroots activists and artists in over half the world.

We have realized exponential growth in such a short period of time: nearly six-toupling our budget, doubling our staff—who now span 10 cities, 6 countries, and three continents—with an ever-evolving eye for providing radically transformative grantmaking and capacity building on the ground. We have done so while expanding our philanthropic voice. Astraea has shown up and spoken up for philanthropic action that embodies the best of what we have learned as an institution: fund the long-game, respect the steps, fund without restriction, trust the innovation in our communities, center the voices at the intersections of lived experience, know we are the ones we’ve been waiting for. In short, be bold. And we have.

I am proud to have served a vision so much larger than myself—embodied by every activist/artist/donor who bravely shows up to bring a just and joyous world to fruition. They (you) have allowed me to bring my best self to work every day I was able. Running a foundation is not easy! Working in the movements you’re from is difficult. Building partnership and ally-ship, starting and sustaining conversations, growing while doing, being a singular entity in every room—all without a roadmap because it had never been done before—because I had never done anything like this before—is profoundly challenging, but that is Astraea’s charge. The staff shows up to this calling magnificently. My gratitude to them is immeasurable. It has been my deepest honor to work alongside them and steward us during this time.

Paramount to my decision to transition was being able to leave the organization in the best possible position. Two key factors make me confident I am doing so. This past year, we have secured significant multi-year partnerships that will ground the work both programmatically and organizationally for many years to come. These partnerships mark the next wave of “new beginnings” for Astraea. And now. I will work alongside staff and board leadership during a period of transition. You will continue to hear more from us as our next steps unfold. I suspect we will lean into you, our trusted community, as we enter the next stage of Astraea’s evolution. I am writing to you with so much gratitude and so much excitement for Astraea’s future. I urge you, as I surely will, to continue to support Astraea’s growth, purpose, and vision. We need her more than ever.

In deep solidarity, 
(as ever)
– B

 J. Bob Alotta
Executive Director 
Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice


A letter from Astraea’s board:

As Bob announces her transition, we express our deep gratitude for her visionary leadership of the profoundly challenging and liberatory work that is Astraea’s charge. In the constantly shifting political landscape of the past 8 years, Bob has stayed steady, bold, and clear about Astraea’s role in transcending borders and building futures for LGBTQI people pursuing social justice and human rights. 
 
She has expanded the organization and kept us on the cutting edge, positioning Astraea to the level of global influence we have today. As an ambassador for Astraea, Bob has excelled at navigating complex cultural and political spaces, breaking down silos, and centering LGBTQI human rights wherever she goes. Through her vision and work in partnership with Astraea’s incredible staff, we have accomplished many breakthroughs in strengthening the capacity of LGBTQI grassroots leaders.

Bob has led Astraea in a powerful arc of organizational growth and sustainability, and we are well-positioned to pivot to welcome a new leader. We ask our grantee partners to act in bold and transformative ways and so we are transforming ourselves as well by celebrating Bob’s accomplishments and meeting the evolving needs of the movement. In this current political moment of escalating violence against LGBTQI communities, it is clear that there is a heightened need for Astraea’s role. We are deeply committed to working with Bob to steward Astraea through this transition so that we can continue to provide critical grantmaking and capacity building for LGBTQI grassroots leaders around the world.

The Astraea board has begun the process of identifying an interim executive director and working alongside staff to create a roadmap for the steps forward. We thank Bob for her immense dedication to Astraea’s mission and wish her the very best as her next chapter begins.

Signed,

Iimay Ho and Eboné Bishop, Co-Chairs 
On behalf of the board of directors

Join us for a #FeministFunding Twitter chat!

Please join us for a global Twitter chat on #FeministFunding on June 11, 2019 at 10am EST, co-hosted by Astraea, the African Women’s Development Fund, FRIDA | The Young Feminist Fund, the Red Umbrella Fund and Urgent Action Fund Asia and Pacific!

We are in an intense political moment. LGBTQI people, women’s rights and social justice movements are facing heightened backlash, rising conservatism, and well-organized and robustly funded oppositions. Feminist and progressive funders have been challenging philanthropy to meet this moment in more radical and transformative ways.

To this end, please join us for a global Twitter chat on #FeministFunding on June 11, 2019 at 10am EST, co-hosted by Astraea, the African Women’s Development Fund, FRIDA | The Young Feminist Fund, the Red Umbrella Fund and Urgent Action Fund Asia and Pacific!

Our intention is to spark conversation on the importance of #FeministFunding, ignite critical discussion about how philanthropy can meet this political moment, and amplify the many amazing tools and resources that many of us have developed. On our side, we’ll be excited to share the Feminist Funding Principles that we just launched. During the discussion, we encourage participants to share their own resources about feminist funding so we and other participants can amplify them.

If you plan to participate, please RSVP to Kim Kaletsky, Communications Manager, via kkaletsky@astraeafoundation.org. Participants who’ve RSVP’ed in advance will receive a list of the questions we’ll discuss during the chat several days before. Otherwise, the chat will be open to the public to participate.

Can’t participate? We’ll be holding a second conversation in July or August, so stay tuned!

Discussion Questions:

  1. Why is #FeministFunding so urgently needed in this moment?
  2. How does a feminist approach influence how you make your grants and why is this important?
  3. Which communities affected by gender oppression are excluded from funding and how can philanthropy do better?
  4. How does funding across movements and issues more effectively address injustice than single-issue funding?
  5. #FeministFunding means looking beyond traditional “women’s rights” concerns. What critical issues must we contend with today?
  6. What is one action you will take to further embed #FeministFunding practices in your work or encourage other donors to do so?

Astraea’s Feminist Funding Principles

Astraea has developed our ten Feminist Funding Principles to share what we have learned over the last four decades about what it takes to support activists on the frontlines to make enduring social change.

As a feminist fund, Astraea believes the strongest approaches to achieving justice center the needs and visions of people who face multiple oppressions. We believe it is our responsibility to redistribute money as a mechanism toward redistributing power, so movement agendas are controlled by activists, organizations, and communities.

To that end, Astraea has developed our ten Feminist Funding Principles to share what we have learned over the last four decades about what it takes to support activists on the frontlines to make enduring social change.

Read more

Digital Security and Decolonization: Astraea’s CommsLabs in the Dominican Republic

In September 2018, Astraea hosted our 4th CommsLabs in Punta Cana in the Dominican Republic. Read more about it below!

Photo Credit: Carlos Rodríguez

As LGBTQI activists working in extremely challenging environments, we don’t always have the time to sit down and think about our communication strategies, let alone have conversations with other organizations about shared concerns, achievements, struggles, what works, and what doesn’t. CommsLabs has given us the space to keep hope alive and maintain our heads above the water.

– Tasmy Gomez, activist and Digital Communications Strategist with the organization Colectiva Mujer y Salud (CMS) in the Dominican Republic

In September 2018, Astraea hosted our 4th CommsLabs* in Punta Cana in the Dominican Republic. Co-designed and co-facilitated by grantee partners from Latin America and the Caribbean, it was an opportunity for LGBTQI+ activists from all over the region to build capacity, experiment with new tools and technologies, and intentionally connect with each other both within and across movements to break down the structures of racism, patriarchy, and colonialism.

CommsLabs convenings like the one held in the Dominican Republic link technology training to grassroots organizing supporting participants to strengthen technology skills, skills-share with one another, and connect the physical and digital organizing spheres, ultimately building collective power. Yet, CommsLabs is about more than just connecting activists with the technologies of now and of the future – the convenings are structured in such a way that they create spaces for organizers to rest, rejuvenate, reflect, and recharge.

Over three days, activists attended workshops and trainings on issues ranging from holistic security to strategic communications, and effective campaign-building. These sessions brought together 20 activists from the Dominican Republic, 3 from Puerto Rico, and 2 from Guatemala, to work together to build creative messaging and develop their organizing tactics, as well as discuss the particular challenges they face. The group also included eight feminist and queer Latin American organizers and trainers.

CommsLabs are co-created with grantee partners, who are a part of the process from the initial strategy meetings to the regional tech assessments , as well as designing the tracks, and identifying trainers and facilitators. For Brenda Salas Neves, Program Officer at Astraea, the involvement of grantee partners from the country and the region in the design and strategy stages is critical. “CommsLabs has to be rooted in the community and local priorities in order for it to work. We worked with trainers from the region and local grantee partners to create thoughtful programming that reflected the political and social priorities of grassroots activists within the region. As funders, our role is to center the needs of our grantees, and to provide support and solidarity, acknowledging the power that we hold, by sharing that power and helping to create as participatory an environment as possible.”

Finding ways to keep hope alive is critical for activists whose bodies, identities, and lives are on the line everyday. A unique healing space known as Siesta Negra was set up for activists to reground themselves in the midst of the convening. Siesta Negra was led by facilitator Jeannetee Tineo, who was inspired by an art exhibit held in Madrid under the same name, by queer feminist Afro-Latino-American artist duo niv Acosta and Fannie Sosa. The space included a collectively created altar which had spiritual symbols, names of people the group wanted to commemorate, and a map of the Caribbean. Opening and closing rituals – influenced by Yoruba and other Caribbean practices – took place there everyday.

Siesta Negra provided an opportunity for activists to go beyond digital security to address the threats to their personal safety and well-being by utilizing healing justice frameworks and self-care techniques. “By recovering ancestral technologies and practices, and utilizing them simultaneously with current ones, we can build in a context more accurate to our own geographies. I truly believe that these ancestral practices can also guide our actions toward more successful outcomes. Rather than glorifying stress, over-work, and sacrifice, we can bring back better self-care practices that will then allow us to remain stronger and better connected with each other,” said Tasmy from grantee partner CMS.

In other sessions, activists had the opportunity to have open dialogues on often ‘taboo’ or silenced subjects such as the effects of racial dynamics and anti-blackness across the region, or the specific challenges and threats faced by trans folks, even within the LGBTQI+ community. Facilitators held conversations about race in the Caribbean, creating space for people to share personal experiences around discrimination and rights. The conversation aimed to give participants an opportunity to collaboratively respond to the challenges they face, and envision possible solutions and strategies for fighting back against violence.

Mujeres al Borde from Colombia also facilitated a video sharing session that reflected the lived experiences of queer and gender non-conforming people in the country. Participants were encouraged to exchange personal stories about how they imagined and understood their erotic selves and sexualities. This sparked conversations about the power of storytelling from those often at the margins, and the importance of visibility.

With digital and online campaigns comprising a major component of organizing today, the convening combined these dialogues with workshops where activists shared software, online tips, and expertise – leaving the convening with fresh ideas, skills, and tools.

—–

* Astraea’s CommsLabs is a radical global movement-building initiative that equips LGBTQI activists with the tools, skills and knowledge they need to securely organize and advocate in online spaces. Through a series of regional or country-based convenings, each Lab connects local LGBTQI activists, trainers, healers and technologists in an effort to address the online and offline threats facing LGBTQI communities, and seize the opportunities technology presents. To date, we have held four convenings: South Africa, Kenya, Colombia and the Dominican Republic, and a forthcoming convening is planned to take place in the United States in 2019.

Learn more about the convening in our video below:

Healing Justice: Building Power, Transforming Movements – New Report

Today, we are thrilled to share our new report, Healing Justice: Building Power, Transforming Movements.

Today, we are thrilled to share our new report, Healing Justice: Building Power, Transforming Movements, featuring work from the brilliant artist Amir Khadar.

Especially critical during this heightened time of anti-migrant, anti-Black, misogynist and anti-LGBTQI violence, this collection of stories, learnings and recommendations lifts up resiliency and survival practices that center the collective safety and wellbeing of communities as an integral part of our fight for collective liberation.
 
We have learned from our grantee partners, community advisors and peer funders how healing justice is a tool for building power, and how it can deepen and sustain the long, hard work of movement-building. 
 
On May 16, we’ll be convening 75 funders in New York to discuss how we can deepen philanthropic support for this critical work. We’ll be livestreaming the morning and afternoon panels! Please join us on our Facebook page from 10:30am-12:00pm and 1:45-3:45 pm EST.

From these stories and learnings, we hope that we can grow and learn ourselves—unpacking and unraveling our assumptions of what healing and safety can look like within movements, and equipping ourselves to answer the call of resourcing this work for the long haul.

In deep solidarity,
Brenda Salas Neves, Senior Program Officer
Cara Page, Program Consultant
Sarah Gunther, Director of Philanthropic Partnerships

Read the online report

Stand with Caster Semenya!

The recent ruling of the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) against Caster Semenya is not only a major setback for intersex human rights but reveals how intersex people—especially those who are Black and Brown—continue to be dehumanized and systematically excluded from all spheres of life, including sports.

Photo: La sud africaine: Caster Semenya, médaille d’argent aux 800m; Source: Wikimedia Commons

The recent ruling of the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) against Caster Semenya is not only a major setback for intersex human rights but reveals how intersex peopleespecially those who are Black and Brown—continue to be dehumanized and systematically excluded from all spheres of life, including sports.

On May 1st, 2019, the South African Olympic athlete lost her challenge against the International Association of Athletics Federation (IAAF), whose new rules restrict testosterone levels in female runners.

As often happens, the news about the ruling and the ensuing media coverage revolved around medicine and testosterone levelsnot the human at the centre of the ruling, her rights, her body and her life.

“Caster Semenyaa black African female athletehas not only been barred from doing what she does bestrunningbut she’s been repeatedly stripped of her privacy, dignity and autonomy,” says Ruth Baldacchino, Astraea’s Intersex Human Rights Fund Program Officer.

“This is an appalling ruling, based solely on sexist, intersexophobic, transphobic and racist stereotypes. This is a serious setback for the rights of all the intersex, trans and gender non-conforming athletes competing in women categories, and may lead to similar regulations in other sports. What we are seeing is an ideological shrinking around traditional gender stereotypes instead of an honest discussion on the relevance of binary sex-segregated sports categories,” said intersex activist Loé Petit, who is a Program Associate for the Intersex Human Rights Fund at Astraea.

The ruling not only stigmatizes intersex people, but also fails to recognize the truth of what it means to be a competitive athletenatural genetic advantages that set you apart to win. Advantages that are celebrated not regulated, be they cardiac capacity, lactic acid levels, etc. The fact that genetic endowment is not regulated in men’s sports goes to show that the IAAF ruling is an overt form of gender policing, and not at all an issue of sports justice.

“As a Black woman, Caster has been perceived as a threat by (white) athletes and sports governing bodies simply because she runs fast. There are countless discriminatory practices and human rights violations that have been committed towards many intersex athletes in the run-up to this ruling. We want to reiterate the demands of the global intersex movement for international, regional and national human rights institutions to take on board and address intersex human rights violations, and in so doing, find adequate solutions for redress and reparations in direct collaboration with intersex representatives and organisations,” says Baldacchino.

“Restrictive binary notions of sex and gender are systems set up to alienate LGBTQI people and tell us we do not belong; they are destructive to us all. But we will not be silent. We will not be legislated out of existence. Our bodies and lives are not open for debate or political opinion, they are a critical part of our lives and our liberation. Our response is to rise up in solidarityto support the fiercest intersex organizations on the ground around the world fighting for bodily autonomy and the right to live life freely, with dignity,” said J. Bob Alotta, Astraea Executive Director.

For more information on the ruling, please read statements from our grantee partners Iranti and Intersex South Africa here.

Lesbian Visibility Day 2019

Today, on Lesbian Visibility Day, we’re honoring our lesbian roots by celebrating grantee partners all over the world who fight day in and day out to build community and secure the rights and dignity of LBQ* women through powerful activism, movement-building, arts, and social and cultural change.

Today, on Lesbian Visibility Day, we’re honoring our lesbian roots by celebrating grantee partners all over the world who fight day in and day out to build community and secure the rights and dignity of LBQ* women through powerful activism, movement-building, arts, and social and cultural change.

Astraea came out as a lesbian organization in 1990. Claiming our lesbian identity has always been a politically conscious choice to visibilize lesbian communities and activism which are critical in social justice movements, but whose efforts have often been unacknowledged, or erased.

We recognize ‘lesbian’ as both a sexual orientation and political identity; that it must include trans, intersex, bisexual, and queer women who identify as such or feel connected to lesbian activism, while respecting that the full spectrum of people who experience gendered oppression includes trans men, non-binary people, and more.

“We don’t get to see anybody like us when we grow up. For me, the first thing a movement tells me is that you are not alone.”
– Sappho For Equality, India

Watch lesbian-led grantee partner Sappho for Equality from India share about their activism in this new video.

This year, Astraea supported powerful LBQ* visions by awarding 92 grants to 72 LBQ-led organizations worldwide, totaling over $1.7 million. Beyond grantmaking, we are continuing to shift power and resources to these movements by:

To see some of our lesbian feminist milestones from the last 41 years, watch our new Lesbian Visibility Day video above.

Join us in building power for LBQ* movements everywhere.

Donate

 

 

*LBQ stands for lesbian, bisexual, and queer, and includes lesbian-identified trans, intersex, and nonbinary people.