Astraea’s Feminist Funding Principles

Astraea has developed our ten Feminist Funding Principles to share what we have learned over the last four decades about what it takes to support activists on the frontlines to make enduring social change.

As a feminist fund, Astraea believes the strongest approaches to achieving justice center the needs and visions of people who face multiple oppressions. We believe it is our responsibility to redistribute money as a mechanism toward redistributing power, so movement agendas are controlled by activists, organizations, and communities.

To that end, Astraea has developed our ten Feminist Funding Principles to share what we have learned over the last four decades about what it takes to support activists on the frontlines to make enduring social change.

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Digital Security and Decolonization: Astraea’s CommsLabs in the Dominican Republic

In September 2018, Astraea hosted our 4th CommsLabs in Punta Cana in the Dominican Republic. Read more about it below!

Photo Credit: Carlos Rodríguez

As LGBTQI activists working in extremely challenging environments, we don’t always have the time to sit down and think about our communication strategies, let alone have conversations with other organizations about shared concerns, achievements, struggles, what works, and what doesn’t. CommsLabs has given us the space to keep hope alive and maintain our heads above the water.

– Tasmy Gomez, activist and Digital Communications Strategist with the organization Colectiva Mujer y Salud (CMS) in the Dominican Republic

In September 2018, Astraea hosted our 4th CommsLabs* in Punta Cana in the Dominican Republic. Co-designed and co-facilitated by grantee partners from Latin America and the Caribbean, it was an opportunity for LGBTQI+ activists from all over the region to build capacity, experiment with new tools and technologies, and intentionally connect with each other both within and across movements to break down the structures of racism, patriarchy, and colonialism.

CommsLabs convenings like the one held in the Dominican Republic link technology training to grassroots organizing supporting participants to strengthen technology skills, skills-share with one another, and connect the physical and digital organizing spheres, ultimately building collective power. Yet, CommsLabs is about more than just connecting activists with the technologies of now and of the future – the convenings are structured in such a way that they create spaces for organizers to rest, rejuvenate, reflect, and recharge.

Over three days, activists attended workshops and trainings on issues ranging from holistic security to strategic communications, and effective campaign-building. These sessions brought together 20 activists from the Dominican Republic, 3 from Puerto Rico, and 2 from Guatemala, to work together to build creative messaging and develop their organizing tactics, as well as discuss the particular challenges they face. The group also included eight feminist and queer Latin American organizers and trainers.

CommsLabs are co-created with grantee partners, who are a part of the process from the initial strategy meetings to the regional tech assessments , as well as designing the tracks, and identifying trainers and facilitators. For Brenda Salas Neves, Program Officer at Astraea, the involvement of grantee partners from the country and the region in the design and strategy stages is critical. “CommsLabs has to be rooted in the community and local priorities in order for it to work. We worked with trainers from the region and local grantee partners to create thoughtful programming that reflected the political and social priorities of grassroots activists within the region. As funders, our role is to center the needs of our grantees, and to provide support and solidarity, acknowledging the power that we hold, by sharing that power and helping to create as participatory an environment as possible.”

Finding ways to keep hope alive is critical for activists whose bodies, identities, and lives are on the line everyday. A unique healing space known as Siesta Negra was set up for activists to reground themselves in the midst of the convening. Siesta Negra was led by facilitator Jeannetee Tineo, who was inspired by an art exhibit held in Madrid under the same name, by queer feminist Afro-Latino-American artist duo niv Acosta and Fannie Sosa. The space included a collectively created altar which had spiritual symbols, names of people the group wanted to commemorate, and a map of the Caribbean. Opening and closing rituals – influenced by Yoruba and other Caribbean practices – took place there everyday.

Siesta Negra provided an opportunity for activists to go beyond digital security to address the threats to their personal safety and well-being by utilizing healing justice frameworks and self-care techniques. “By recovering ancestral technologies and practices, and utilizing them simultaneously with current ones, we can build in a context more accurate to our own geographies. I truly believe that these ancestral practices can also guide our actions toward more successful outcomes. Rather than glorifying stress, over-work, and sacrifice, we can bring back better self-care practices that will then allow us to remain stronger and better connected with each other,” said Tasmy from grantee partner CMS.

In other sessions, activists had the opportunity to have open dialogues on often ‘taboo’ or silenced subjects such as the effects of racial dynamics and anti-blackness across the region, or the specific challenges and threats faced by trans folks, even within the LGBTQI+ community. Facilitators held conversations about race in the Caribbean, creating space for people to share personal experiences around discrimination and rights. The conversation aimed to give participants an opportunity to collaboratively respond to the challenges they face, and envision possible solutions and strategies for fighting back against violence.

Mujeres al Borde from Colombia also facilitated a video sharing session that reflected the lived experiences of queer and gender non-conforming people in the country. Participants were encouraged to exchange personal stories about how they imagined and understood their erotic selves and sexualities. This sparked conversations about the power of storytelling from those often at the margins, and the importance of visibility.

With digital and online campaigns comprising a major component of organizing today, the convening combined these dialogues with workshops where activists shared software, online tips, and expertise – leaving the convening with fresh ideas, skills, and tools.

—–

* Astraea’s CommsLabs is a radical global movement-building initiative that equips LGBTQI activists with the tools, skills and knowledge they need to securely organize and advocate in online spaces. Through a series of regional or country-based convenings, each Lab connects local LGBTQI activists, trainers, healers and technologists in an effort to address the online and offline threats facing LGBTQI communities, and seize the opportunities technology presents. To date, we have held four convenings: South Africa, Kenya, Colombia and the Dominican Republic, and a forthcoming convening is planned to take place in the United States in 2019.

Learn more about the convening in our video below:

Healing Justice: Building Power, Transforming Movements – New Report

Today, we are thrilled to share our new report, Healing Justice: Building Power, Transforming Movements.

Today, we are thrilled to share our new report, Healing Justice: Building Power, Transforming Movements, featuring work from the brilliant artist Amir Khadar.

Especially critical during this heightened time of anti-migrant, anti-Black, misogynist and anti-LGBTQI violence, this collection of stories, learnings and recommendations lifts up resiliency and survival practices that center the collective safety and wellbeing of communities as an integral part of our fight for collective liberation.
 
We have learned from our grantee partners, community advisors and peer funders how healing justice is a tool for building power, and how it can deepen and sustain the long, hard work of movement-building. 
 
On May 16, we’ll be convening 75 funders in New York to discuss how we can deepen philanthropic support for this critical work. We’ll be livestreaming the morning and afternoon panels! Please join us on our Facebook page from 10:30am-12:00pm and 1:45-3:45 pm EST.

From these stories and learnings, we hope that we can grow and learn ourselves—unpacking and unraveling our assumptions of what healing and safety can look like within movements, and equipping ourselves to answer the call of resourcing this work for the long haul.

In deep solidarity,
Brenda Salas Neves, Senior Program Officer
Cara Page, Program Consultant
Sarah Gunther, Director of Philanthropic Partnerships

Read the online report

Stand with Caster Semenya!

The recent ruling of the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) against Caster Semenya is not only a major setback for intersex human rights but reveals how intersex people—especially those who are Black and Brown—continue to be dehumanized and systematically excluded from all spheres of life, including sports.

Photo: La sud africaine: Caster Semenya, médaille d’argent aux 800m; Source: Wikimedia Commons

The recent ruling of the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) against Caster Semenya is not only a major setback for intersex human rights but reveals how intersex peopleespecially those who are Black and Brown—continue to be dehumanized and systematically excluded from all spheres of life, including sports.

On May 1st, 2019, the South African Olympic athlete lost her challenge against the International Association of Athletics Federation (IAAF), whose new rules restrict testosterone levels in female runners.

As often happens, the news about the ruling and the ensuing media coverage revolved around medicine and testosterone levelsnot the human at the centre of the ruling, her rights, her body and her life.

“Caster Semenyaa black African female athletehas not only been barred from doing what she does bestrunningbut she’s been repeatedly stripped of her privacy, dignity and autonomy,” says Ruth Baldacchino, Astraea’s Intersex Human Rights Fund Program Officer.

“This is an appalling ruling, based solely on sexist, intersexophobic, transphobic and racist stereotypes. This is a serious setback for the rights of all the intersex, trans and gender non-conforming athletes competing in women categories, and may lead to similar regulations in other sports. What we are seeing is an ideological shrinking around traditional gender stereotypes instead of an honest discussion on the relevance of binary sex-segregated sports categories,” said intersex activist Loé Petit, who is a Program Associate for the Intersex Human Rights Fund at Astraea.

The ruling not only stigmatizes intersex people, but also fails to recognize the truth of what it means to be a competitive athletenatural genetic advantages that set you apart to win. Advantages that are celebrated not regulated, be they cardiac capacity, lactic acid levels, etc. The fact that genetic endowment is not regulated in men’s sports goes to show that the IAAF ruling is an overt form of gender policing, and not at all an issue of sports justice.

“As a Black woman, Caster has been perceived as a threat by (white) athletes and sports governing bodies simply because she runs fast. There are countless discriminatory practices and human rights violations that have been committed towards many intersex athletes in the run-up to this ruling. We want to reiterate the demands of the global intersex movement for international, regional and national human rights institutions to take on board and address intersex human rights violations, and in so doing, find adequate solutions for redress and reparations in direct collaboration with intersex representatives and organisations,” says Baldacchino.

“Restrictive binary notions of sex and gender are systems set up to alienate LGBTQI people and tell us we do not belong; they are destructive to us all. But we will not be silent. We will not be legislated out of existence. Our bodies and lives are not open for debate or political opinion, they are a critical part of our lives and our liberation. Our response is to rise up in solidarityto support the fiercest intersex organizations on the ground around the world fighting for bodily autonomy and the right to live life freely, with dignity,” said J. Bob Alotta, Astraea Executive Director.

For more information on the ruling, please read statements from our grantee partners Iranti and Intersex South Africa here.

Lesbian Visibility Day 2019

Today, on Lesbian Visibility Day, we’re honoring our lesbian roots by celebrating grantee partners all over the world who fight day in and day out to build community and secure the rights and dignity of LBQ* women through powerful activism, movement-building, arts, and social and cultural change.

Today, on Lesbian Visibility Day, we’re honoring our lesbian roots by celebrating grantee partners all over the world who fight day in and day out to build community and secure the rights and dignity of LBQ* women through powerful activism, movement-building, arts, and social and cultural change.

Astraea came out as a lesbian organization in 1990. Claiming our lesbian identity has always been a politically conscious choice to visibilize lesbian communities and activism which are critical in social justice movements, but whose efforts have often been unacknowledged, or erased.

We recognize ‘lesbian’ as both a sexual orientation and political identity; that it must include trans, intersex, bisexual, and queer women who identify as such or feel connected to lesbian activism, while respecting that the full spectrum of people who experience gendered oppression includes trans men, non-binary people, and more.

“We don’t get to see anybody like us when we grow up. For me, the first thing a movement tells me is that you are not alone.”
– Sappho For Equality, India

Watch lesbian-led grantee partner Sappho for Equality from India share about their activism in this new video.

This year, Astraea supported powerful LBQ* visions by awarding 92 grants to 72 LBQ-led organizations worldwide, totaling over $1.7 million. Beyond grantmaking, we are continuing to shift power and resources to these movements by:

To see some of our lesbian feminist milestones from the last 41 years, watch our new Lesbian Visibility Day video above.

Join us in building power for LBQ* movements everywhere.

Donate

 

 

*LBQ stands for lesbian, bisexual, and queer, and includes lesbian-identified trans, intersex, and nonbinary people.

Meet our grantee partner, Sappho for Equality!

Listen as Sappho member Sutanuka Bhattacharya shares more about the organization’s work, and what it’s meant to receive support from Astraea.

Born on 20th June, 1999, Sappho is a support group for Lesbian, Bisexual women and Transmen, in Eastern India with its base in Kolkata. Listen as Sappho member Sutanuka Bhattacharya shares more about the organization’s work, and what it’s meant to receive support from Astraea.

Learn more about Sappho for Equality.

Organizing India’s Transgender Communities

In September 2018, the Indian Supreme Court made the groundbreaking decision to overturn Section 377, a colonial-era law that criminalized gay sex. While this is a historic ruling for India’s LGBTQI communities, there still remain insufficient protections for people and communities at the margins. In particular, India’s transgender communities in particular  continue to face legal obstacles to true equality.

By Sabrina Rich, Communications Intern

In September 2018, the Indian Supreme Court made the groundbreaking decision to overturn Section 377, a colonial-era law that criminalized gay sex. While this is a historic ruling for India’s LGBTQI communities, there still remain insufficient protections for people and communities at the margins. In particular, India’s transgender communities continue to face legal obstacles to true equality.

The Indian government made a landmark decision in National Legal Services Authority (NALSA) v. Union of India in 2014. This court case ruled that transgender people have the legal right to self-identify as male, female, or the now legally recognized ‘third gender,’ and affirmed their fundamental rights granted under the Constitution of India. This decision was followed by the introduction of the Transgender Persons (Protection of Rights) Bill, referred to commonly as the Trans Bill. The Trans Bill was intended to implement the protections outlined in the NALSA case. While the original Bill was relatively aligned with the NALSA judgment, 27 new amendments were made which altered its content. In 2018, the Bill was passed in the Lok Sabha, the lower house of Parliament, under claims to protect transgender people and their welfare.

While the Bill’s supporters argue that it will protect trans communities through anti-discrimination measures, the Bill actually poses major challenges to transgender communities. Its definition of ‘transgender’ includes any “trans-man or trans-woman (whether or not such person has undergone Sex Reassignment Surgery or hormone therapy or laser therapy or such other therapy), person with intersex variations, genderqueer and person having such socio-cultural identities as kinner, hijra, aravani and jogta.” Not only does this definition fail to encompass the full spectrum of gender identities, but by conflating intersex people with transgender people, it demonstrates a lack of understanding about differences between biological sex and gender identity.

The Bill would also require that trans individuals obtain a certificate of identity as “proof” of their trans identity. Certificates would only be available to people who are approved by a screening committee, comprised of psychological and medical professionals, government officials, and only one transgender person. Such a committee would take autonomy away from trans and gender non-conforming people and put their gender identities and lived experiences in the hands of cis-dominated institutions. The Trans Bill’s anti-discrimination measures, which claim to protect trans people from discrimination in education, employment, and healthcare, become impossible to access if trans people cannot obtain their required paperwork.

Astraea grantee partner Women’s Initiative (WINS), a women-led organization in Andhra Pradesh working to end violence against stigmatized communities and fighting against the criminalization of sexuality and sex work, has been working alongside trans activists to stop the current Bill from passing in the Rajya Sabha, the upper house of Parliament. We spoke with WINS president R. Meera to hear more about the organization’s strategies for organizing on the ground and in their communities.

In its current form, the Trans Bill does not contain sufficient input from trans community members. According to R. Meera, one of the biggest challenges in mobilizing people in response to the Trans Bill has been that many transgender people are not even aware that it exists. Talking to community members and educating them on the Bill and its potential impacts became an important tactic for WINS and other activists. Describing her early days of organizing against the Bill, R. Meera said, “We spoke to some transgender Activists [and] requested them to mobilise members who have no access to information, knowledge, or skills to comprehend the import of the Bill.” Trans activists discussed and debated the details of the Bill with working class transgender people and other community members who have limited access to resources.

WINS members and other key activists also organized a hearing where a representative of the Indian Administrative Services, a civil service arm of the executive government, presented issues with the Trans Bill to members of Parliament. The intent of this hearing was not only to educate the Parliament on the problematic aspects of the Bill, but also to demonstrate support for transgender people from various sectors of society, including government officials, community members, and allies.

Another potential bill that activists say would harm trans communities is the Trafficking of Persons (Protection, Prevention and Rehabilitation) Bill, which was also recently passed in the Lok Sabha.

The Trafficking Bill would further institutionalize transphobia through language that is intentionally written in a way that can be used to target and criminalize trans people. For example, the Trafficking Bill declares forced begging as a crime punishable by a minimum of ten years in prison and a significant fine. Because transgender people in India are constantly marginalized by and excluded from institutions, including employment and education, many transgender people make their money through begging. Over time, begging has developed as a culture within the trans community that has helped individuals sustain their livelihoods. Though not explicitly about trans people, this provision can be used to target, arrest, and incarcerate trans people who rely on begging as a means of survival.

In addition to begging, many transgender people make a living through sex work. Though sex work is entirely separate from trafficking in that it is consensual, while trafficking is not, the Indian government has conflated the two through the Trafficking Bill. The Bill seeks to implement a “raid, rescue, rehabilitation” model, which in practice would look like raiding brothels and placing the ‘rescued’ women in rehabilitation centers. Because the Bill makes no distinction between trafficked women and consensual sex workers, this provision would likely lead to the forced rehabilitation of sex workers. By conflating these concepts, the Bill would not only criminalize the consensual sex work that many trans people rely on to survive, but also forcefully institutionalize many trans sex workers.

The Trafficking Bill also states that administering hormones to a person for the purpose of early sexual maturity is considered trafficking. Trans elders often help younger trans people gain access to medical practitioners, some of whom are unlicensed sources, in order to access hormone treatments. This clause of the Trafficking Bill criminalizes their lack of awareness, rather than placing the blame on the government for not providing accessible and inclusive medical care.

A more in-depth transgender critique of the Trafficking Bill, provided by Telangana Hijra Transgender Samiti, can be found here.

Both the Trans Bill and the Trafficking Bill have yet to pass in the Rajya Sabha, and activists maintain hope that they won’t. Trans activists and LGBTQI groups have been organizing consistently and tirelessly, drawing important connections between both bills and their impacts.

Ultimately, all of this organizing has resulted in direct action. WINS is one of many organizations, transgender individuals, and allies to organize and attend protests across the country. One of the largest protests against the Trans Bill took place in Delhi on December 28th, 2018. Hundreds of transgender activists and allies from all over India gathered in the nation’s capital to make their demands heard. Organizers across the country have been vocal both online and in their communities about the need for a bill that protects, rather than threatens, transgender rights.

These protections include the removal of the screening committee, the right to self-identify, the establishment of reservations for trans people in education and employment, and adequate access to medical care for trans people.

Protests against the Trafficking Bill are also ongoing. Trans activists, including WINS members, protested at a municipal corporation office in Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh in December 2018. WINS has been an active supporter in the fight against the Trafficking Bill, and R. Meera told us their demands that the Bill be redrafted in order to take the interests of sex workers, trans people, and migrant laborers into account.

Activists hope to prevent the passage of both bills through their continued organizing. Going forward, WINS is working alongside transgender activists to demand that the government ensures all constitutional safeguards including right to life, liberty, and equality, self-determination, and reservations for education and employment. WINS and other activists are fighting for a future that will “give [trans people] power to stand tall and strong.”  

Header Image: Community Members walk the street opposing both Bills; Photo credit: Women’s Initiative (WINS)

Further reading:

Transcending Borders, Building Futures: Our 2018 Annual Report

Join us as we review 2018 with highlights from Astraea and our bold, brilliant grantee partners from around the world.

Friends,

It is with great excitement that we share our 2018 Annual Report, “Transcending Borders, Building Futures.”

In 2018, we made 256 grants totaling $4.6 million to organizations in 69 countries and 21 U.S. states.

We accompanied our movements beyond funding; in addition to making grants, we strategically invested in cross-border LBTQI movement building, we lifted up grassroots organizing by prioritizing the holistic security of activist communities, and we connected beyond oppressive structures to harness the power of ancient and new technologies, providing solidarity in critical times.

Join us as we review 2018 with highlights from Astraea and our bold, brilliant grantee partners from around the world. Read about how together, we are creating the future we believe is possible and necessary for our communities to thrive.

In solidarity,

J. Bob Alotta
Executive Director

Read the report

Trans Day of Visibility 2019

This Trans Day of Visibility, Astraea celebrates the power and vitality of Trans Movements worldwide by uplifting some recent grantee partner achievements in trans organizing.

This Trans Day of Visibility, Astraea celebrates the power and vitality of Trans Movements worldwide by uplifting some recent grantee partner achievements in trans organizing. We are committed to building vibrant and sustainable trans movements globally. This year, we awarded over $1.6M to groups led by trans & gender non-conforming people.

Please join us in lifting up the following achievements:

  • California, U.S.: TGIJP advocated for legislation which passed, allowing incarcerated trans people to change their name and gender marker.
  • Nigeria: THRIN held a large symposium for the trans community and allies.
  • Croatia: Trans Aid held the first national TRANSummer Camp.
  • South Africa: Gender DynamiX redrafted a gender recognition law to incorporate rights for diverse trans people.
  • India: Trans activists and allied groups protested and successfully delayed passage of the regressive Trans Rights Bill.
  • Honduras: CATTRACHAS submitted an argument to the Inter-American Commission for Human Rights for failing to prevent, investigate, and prosecute the execution of a young transgender woman, Vicky Hernández.
  • Malaysia: Justice for Sisters advocated against the Court of Appeal for retracting a decision that affirmed the right of a trans man to change his name and gender marker.
  • Botswana: Rainbow Identity Association created support groups for trans and intersex individuals in regional cities across Botswana.
  • Dominican Republic: TRANSSA opened one of the first community education programs for trans people in the country.
  • Serbia: Gayten-LGBT and Labris Belgrade disputed a law requiring trans people to have “reassignment” surgery in order to change their gender identity on official documents.
  • Chile: OTD advocated for a bill which passed, allowing people over the age of 14 to change their name and gender in official records.
  • New Orleans, U.S.: BreakOUT! proposed a bill on gender inclusive bathrooms which was passed by the mayor.
  • Ukraine: abolished arbitrary and cruel trans health protocol thanks to Insight’s advocacy (2017), but Trans rights activists were attacked with pepper spray during Ukraine march (2018).
  • Kyrgyzstan: Labrys Kyrgyzstan developed a guideline based on WPATH which includes human rights component and guidelines for legal gender recognition, which were signed by the Ministry of Health.

Thanks to all our grantee partners and activists fighting for trans rights across the globe!

Support organizations like these all over the world who are on the front lines of international trans rights movements.

Donate

 

 

Trans Day of Visibility: Resources and Links:

Digital Solidarity at Astraea!

Astraea has always been deeply invested in building capacity and resilience for our movements and communities.

For LGBTQI communities, digital spaces are concurrently the newest sites of inspirational activism and violent backlash. Astraea has always been deeply invested in building capacity and resilience for our movements and communities.

In 2014, with the launch of CommsLabs, we became the first funder to make a major investment in media, communications, and technology in LGBTQI activism globally. Since then, we have held four CommsLabs convenings in Colombia,  Africa and the Dominican Republic.

We’ve recently conducted research in India and Central Asia & Eastern Europe with the ultimate goal of supporting queer and trans activists in their efforts to mitigate surveillance, censorship, and other threats to Internet freedom, as well as to harness the power of technology, communications, and media to further their movements.

This April, some of our staff members will be hosting panels at the upcoming Internet Freedom Festival, so we thought we’d take this opportunity to share some of the exciting, queer, tech-y work Astraea has been up to!


What Astraea’s been up to:


Photo: Internet Freedom Festival 2019 logo. Credit: Internet Freedom Festival

Astraea @ IFF

Astraea will be leading a session entitled ‘Digital Landscapes of Queer & Trans Activism: Threats, Opportunities and Resistance.’ Our Executive Director Bob, one of our Senior Program Officers, Brenda, along with two of our grantee partners from India and Kyrgyzstan, will be presenting at the conference. In this session, we will share key insights from three digital landscape mappings we have conducted in the past year, drawing connections across political and movement contexts in the United States, India, the Dominican Republic, and Central Asia & Eastern Europe.


Photo: Grantee partner Sappho For Equality presentation, 2014. Credit: Sappho For Equality

India Tech Assessment

We are busy compiling a technical assessment of digital organizing in India, which will map and assess the state of digital activism for LGBTQI activists, so stay tuned for that! At IFF, we will be highlighting recommendations around holistic digital security for Indian activists and technologists based on key findings from the report.


Photo: Participants at Astraea’s Dominican Republic CommsLabs, September 2018. Credit: Carlos Rodríguez

CommsLabs Convening in the Dominican Republic

In September 2018, our fourth CommsLabs convening took place in Punta Cana in the Dominican Republic. The convening was an opportunity for activists to collectively build their digital strategies, explore creative storytelling techniques, experiment with media-making, build deeper relationships, and so much more! Hear what participants had to say about the convening in this video.


Photo: LGBT Organization Labrys Kyrgyzstan on Trans Day of Visibility, 2017. Credit: LGBT Organization Labrys Kyrgyzstan

Digital Activism in Central Asia & Eastern Europe

In May 2018, acknowledging that trans activists in Central Asia & Eastern Europe have begun relying on the Internet in particular as a means of organizing, Astraea, along with Transgender Europe (TGEU) produced the report, Mapping Digital Landscapes of Trans Activism in Central Asia & Eastern Europe. Read the report in English and Russian.


Photo: Astraea, Urgent Action Fund, and Labrys Digital Solidarity Convening in Kyrgyzstan, 2018. Credit: Labrys Kyrgyzstan

Queer Digital Solidarity Convening in Kyrgyzstan

Astraea teamed up with the Urgent Action Fund for Women’s Human Rights (UAF) and Labrys Kyrgyzstan in September 2018 to co-create a convening for LGBTQI+ activists from all over the Central Asia & Eastern Europe region to come together and harness the power of digital tools and technology for activism. Read more about it here on our website!


Photo: Speakers Maya Richman (left) and Slammer (right) at Astraea’s Why We Fund: Care and Holistic Security event, 2019. Credit: Bridget de Gersigny

Why We Fund: Care and Holistic Security

Astraea has had the privilege of working with incredible Mozilla fellow Maya Richman since September 2018. As a Mozilla fellow, she is working alongside Astraea to explore and support the security needs of LGBTQI groups around the world. On February 27th, we hosted a Why We Fund event for our New York community during which Maya highlighted learnings from her work here at Astraea, and the value of embedding technologists within under-resourced organisations. She was joined by her colleague Slammer, another Mozilla fellow working with Consumer Reports. View photos from the event here!

Want to support the digital and holistic security of LGBTQI communities globally? Join us!

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