Girls for Gender Equity

Founded in 2002, Girls for Gender Equity (GGE) was a response to a dearth of safe and equitable leadership development programming for girls of color in Brooklyn.

Founded in 2002, Girls for Gender Equity (GGE) was a response to a dearth of safe and equitable leadership development programming for girls of color in Brooklyn. After incidents of sexual violence rocked the Bedford-Stuyvesant community, GGE expanded their mission to address the root causes of gender-based violence and uplift the human and civil rights of young people of color. Centering the voices and experiences of LGBQI/TGNC youth of color–girls and women of color in particular–GGE uses advocacy, organizing, and education to challenge structural forces that work to constrict their rights, expression, and freedom to live self-determined lives. With a distinct focus on safety and equity where young people live and learn, GGE’s base of cisgender girls of color trans youth, and gender non-conforming young people has pushed them to fight criminalization in schools, where sexual and gender nonconformity is stifled through law enforcement agents and harsh discipline.

Blackbird

Blackbird believes in the power of everyday people to organize and solve their own problems given the adequate space, resources, and tools.

Blackbird believes in the power of everyday people to organize and solve their own problems given the adequate space, resources, and tools. Blackbird’s mission is to work with Black organizers, organizations, and Black people interested in organizing and social justice work to build durable, sustainable movement infrastructure, and identify best practices in moments of crises. They aim to facilitate national interventions on criminalization, incarceration, state violence, and the inability of Black communities to access their fundamental human rights. Blackbird’s strategy centers collaboration throughout local, national, and international communities. Locally, they provide rapid response and capacity-building support; nationally, they work to foster strong networks between Black-led, indigenous, and people of color movements; and internationally, they connect leaders within the Movement for Black Lives to leaders of Black movements in locations outside the U.S. such as Brazil and South Africa in order to learn and strategize with each other.

Freedom to Thrive (Formerly Enlace)

Enlace works to create a world where safety means investment in people & planet and to end the punishment-based criminal and immigration systems.

Freedom to Thrive (Formerly Enlace) works to create a world where safety means investment in people & planet and to end the punishment-based criminal and immigration systems.

We are building a powerful Black and Brown network, centering youth, nonbinary, and femme leadership. We engage our network in our Prison Industry Divestment Campaign and the Freedom Cities & Freedom Campuses Movement to address criminalization and incarceration.

Our Institute builds leadership of directly impacted people to develop campaigns addressing the root causes of oppression to bring about transformation and collective liberation. Our approach to leadership development centers healing justice and political education in service of supporting empowered individuals capable of advancing a collective vision for social justice through mobilization and action. The Umoja program supports the leadership of black youth and provides on the field organizing experience with campaigns combating criminalization. Our We Rise training program supports femme and non-binary organizers of color to deepen their campaigning skills and build healing justice and wellness practices that sustain personal resiliency.

Freedom to Thrive was founded in 1998 by visionary organizations in North America and Asia to support women of color led grassroots organizations to campaign against transnational corporations. After game changing victories like the International Sara Lee Campaign, which proved under-resourced grassroots groups could win demands for workers against multinational corporations, we developed strategic frameworks that became the Integrated Organizing Approach (IOA) Methodology. Our Institute launched shortly after, to train frontline leaders in the IOA frameworks in order to build intersectional campaigns that address root causes of state and corporate violence.

Image credit: Jake Ratner

Ella Baker Center

With a base of incarcerated people, formerly incarcerated people, and their loved ones, the Ella Baker Center distinctly uses their membership program as a way for anyone anywhere – but especially those who have been harmed by the justice system – to join the movement to create a safe and just nation.

Since 1996, the Ella Baker Center has fought to challenge police violence and advance a human agenda in the U.S. With a base of incarcerated people, formerly incarcerated people, and their loved ones, the Ella Baker Center distinctly uses their membership program as a way for anyone anywhere – but especially those who have been harmed by the justice system – to join the movement to create a safe and just nation. Members organize through a process of Truth and Reinvestment: telling the truth about the impact of our country’s long history of racial injustice, building the power of those who have been harmed, and engaging them as leaders to redirect the country’s criminal justice approach from punishment and prisons to the investment of resources in redemption, growth, and support for individuals and communities. The Ella Baker Center works at the local, regional, and state level in California to end mass incarceration and push for the investment in healing over punishment; increase policymaker commitment to re-allocating public criminal justice resources towards community-based prevention, treatment, and reentry services; and engage families and communities in building new models of community safety grounded in economic opportunity and alternatives to incarceration.

Black Alliance for Just Immigration (BAJI)

Black Alliance for Just Immigration is a racial and migrant rights organization which engages in organizing, education, advocacy, and cross-cultural alliance building in order to end the racism, criminalization, and economic disenfranchisement of Black immigrants, refugees, and African American communities.

Black Alliance for Just Immigration is a racial and migrant rights organization which engages in organizing, education, advocacy, and cross-cultural alliance building in order to end the racism, criminalization, and economic disenfranchisement of Black immigrants, refugees, and African American communities. They recognize that, like African Americans, Black immigrants and refugees suffer the consequences of racial and gender injustice in the U.S., including the impact of mass criminalization, harsh immigration enforcement policies, economic inequality, and lack of access to adequate health care. Utilizing an array of strategies to tackle these issues, BAJI works with Black migrant communities in eight cities including New York, Oakland, Atlanta, Minneapolis, Miami, Boston, and Washington, DC, and have members throughout the United States.

Image credit: Esther Y. Lee

BYP100

BYP100 envisions a world where all Black people have economic, social, political and educational freedom.

BYP100 envisions a world where all Black people have economic, social, political and educational freedom. Founded in 2013, BYP100 is a member-based activist organization of Black 18-35-year-olds grounded in a Black queer feminist politic that centers their organizing efforts on issues acutely impacting those who are historically marginalized, including women, workers, and LGBTQ communities.

Arizona Queer Undocumented Immigrant Project (Az-QUIP)

Trans Queer Pueblo, formed in 2016 as a merger between Arcoiris Liberation Team and the Arizona Queer Undocumented Immigrant Project, is a grassroots group working for the liberation of trans/queer migrant communities in Phoenix, both in side and outside of detention walls.

Trans Queer Pueblo, formed in 2016 as a merger between Arcoiris Liberation Team and the Arizona Queer Undocumented Immigrant Project, is a grassroots group working for the liberation of trans/queer migrant communities in Phoenix, both in side and outside of detention walls. Their key programs fall in four areas: Economic Justice, which builds the economic resilience of formerly detained people; Community Defense, which organizes and builds leadership of trans women; Health Justice, which facilitates access to primary care services and builds leadership of health promoters; and Family Acceptance, which supports and organizes family members of LGBTQ immigrants to engage in migrant justice work. They have organized successful case-by-case advocacy campaigns to free LGBTQ immigrants from detention. They also contributed to winning access to gender-affirming and migration-affirming municipal IDs through participation in the OnePhoenixID campaign and effectively mobilizing immigrant parents to speak out at school and community forums throughout the city.

Arcoiris Liberation Team

Trans Queer Pueblo, formed in 2016 as a merger between Arcoiris Liberation Team and the Arizona Queer Undocumented Immigrant Project, is a grassroots group working for the liberation of trans/queer migrant communities in Phoenix, both in side and outside of detention walls.

Trans Queer Pueblo, formed in 2016 as a merger between Arcoiris Liberation Team and the Arizona Queer Undocumented Immigrant Project, is a grassroots group working for the liberation of trans/queer migrant communities in Phoenix, both in side and outside of detention walls. Their key programs fall in four areas: Economic Justice, which builds the economic resilience of formerly detained people; Community Defense, which organizes and builds leadership of trans women; Health Justice, which facilitates access to primary care services and builds leadership of health promoters; and Family Acceptance, which supports and organizes family members of LGBTQ immigrants to engage in migrant justice work. They have organized successful case-by-case advocacy campaigns to free LGBTQ immigrants from detention. They also contributed to winning access to gender-affirming and migration-affirming municipal IDs through participation in the OnePhoenixID campaign and effectively mobilizing immigrant parents to speak out at school and community forums throughout the city.

Power Inside

Power Inside is a human rights and harm reduction organization that serves women and girls who are survivors of gender-based violence and oppression and impacted by incarceration, street life and abuse.

Power Inside is a human rights and harm reduction organization that serves women and girls who are survivors of gender-based violence and oppression and impacted by incarceration, street life and abuse. Through a prison abolition framework, they fight for social change via direct services, advocacy and activism, radical harm reduction, street outreach, leadership development and public education. Recently, Power Inside advocated for the inclusion of incarceration, survival sex, gendered violence, and LGBTQ hate-motivated violence in the city-wide screening tool used to evaluate homeless vulnerability, and successfully pushed for the Healthy Births for Incarcerated Women Act in Maryland.