At Power Rising, LBTQ Representation Mattered

Black women are already pushing through racism and sexism, and some of us are pushing through homophobia and transphobia as well.

By Zakiya J. Lord, Regional Development and Engagement Officer

As far back as folks can recall, Black women have a history of leading, reaching back, seeking clarity, and uplifting and wanting the best for others. That being said, there is also the reputation of Black folks not always being so welcoming to out, open, unapologetic LBTQ folks, and that contradiction just is. True or untrue, that reputation exists.

But from the onset of the recent Power Rising Summit in Atlanta, there was mention of LBTQ folks by name, and notably, it was out of the mouths of leaders with “reverend” in their titles. This matters. There is power in visibility. There is power in intention. Although intention and impact are not the same when we are discussing harm, it is notable when discussing inclusion and efforts to get it right.

What was truly revolutionary about Power Rising—and what I’d like to see in all spaces moving forward—was that as it forged ahead, so did the inclusion of LBTQ women. Even the litany from the event raised up our voices…

Read more on Rewire

Intersex Justice Project (IJP)

The Intersex Justice Project (IJP) seeks the end of medically invasive and unnecessary surgeries in the United States that target intersex children and adolescents by empowering intersex people of color to advance that change.

The Intersex Justice Project (IJP) was formed in 2017. IJP was formed in response to a visible lack of intersex people of color in leadership in the United States. IJP started by issuing statements on behalf of intersex people of color for Intersex Awareness Day in 2016. The following year, they decided to protest Lurie Children’s Hospital in Chicago, Illinois. Their campaign against Lurie Children’s Hospital is the foundation of their work. People follow their campaign using the hashtag #endintersexsurgery. Their mission is: “The Intersex Justice Project (IJP) seeks the end of medically invasive and unnecessary surgeries in the United States that target intersex children and adolescents by empowering intersex people of color to advance that change. IJP is dedicated to the inalienable rights of intersex people of color in the United States, however, we are committed to forming alliances and coalitions with other intersex people of color both nationally and globally.”

A Discussion with Mary Hooks of SONG

On August 30th, Astraea is hosting a community discussion with Mary Hooks, Co-Director of SONG.

On August 30th, Astraea is hosting a community discussion with Mary Hooks, Co-Director of SONG. Join us at The Foundation Center of Atlanta to hear about SONG’s recent #BlackMamaBailOut action that freed 64 Black mothers and caregivers across the South on Mother’s Day and garnered national attention and support to the tune of 3,000 donors raising over $200,000.

Mary will share what it meant to lead this action and the collaborative efforts involved, why the action matters—especially now—and some of SONG’s learnings along the way. This will be a casual conversation filled with insight, candor and opportunity for learning and to be in community.

To join us there, RSVP here!

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Astraea is the only philanthropic organization working exclusively to advance LGBTQI human rights around the globe. We support brilliant and brave grantee partners in the U.S. and internationally who challenge oppression and seed change. We work for racial, economic, social, and gender justice, because we all deserve to live our lives freely, without fear, and with dignity.

SPARK Reproductive Justice Now

SPARK envisions a future where communities in Georgia and the South have resources and power to make sustainable and liberatory decisions about their bodies, gender, sexualities, and lives.

SPARK envisions a future where communities in Georgia and the South have resources and power to make sustainable and liberatory decisions about their bodies, gender, sexualities, and lives. Based in Atlanta, SPARK aims to queer the Reproductive Justice movement and uplift people of color living in the Trans experience. Successfully bringing a racial justice and queer liberation framework to the reproductive justice movement in Georgia and the Southeast, they believe that the Queer and Trans youth of color living in the South have a unique experience of reproductive violence, and body and gender oppression. In particular, this requires them to go beyond the traditional focus of access to abortion and contraception. Working with communities that face daily obstacles of homelessness, displacement, poverty, immigration surveillance and detention, inaccessible health care and inadequate health insurance, and stigma against people living with HIV, SPARK creatively uses collective action, policy advocacy, leadership development to create impact and empower their base.