Transgender, Gender Variant, and Intersex Justice Project

TGIJP was founded in 2004 with the mission to challenge and end human rights abuses against transgender, gender variant and intersex people, especially transgender women, in California prisons and beyond.

TGIJP was founded in 2004 with the mission to challenge and end human rights abuses against transgender, gender variant and intersex people, especially transgender women, in California prisons and beyond. While TGIJP has done some legal work for intersex individuals caught within the prison industrial complex, its leadership team has long wanted to expand its work in this area to fully realize its name and mission. In 2014, an intersex individual joined the TGIJP’s core volunteer team. TGIJP is now working to increase the visibility of intersex issues in their current programming (e.g. publishing information in their newsletter and raising intersex issues with current allies); conducting internal education for staff, core leadership and members; developing collaborative relationships with intersex organizations; and conducting outreach to identify imprisoned intersex people, share information and support their ability to self-advocate and self-organize.

Check out our 2018 International Trans Day of Visibility video featuring an interview with TGIJP’s former Executive Director, Miss Major:

Learn more about the documentary 2015 Global Arts Fund grantee partner Annalise Ophelian made about Miss Major:

Community United Against Violence, Inc. (CUAV)

CUAV is a 37 year-old community organization. Their current programs seek to build the wellness, leadership, and collective power of low- and no-income LGBTQ people of color who are surviving the brunt of violence, poverty, and criminalization.

CUAV is a 37 year-old community organization. Their current programs seek to build the wellness, leadership, and collective power of low- and no-income LGBTQ people of color who are surviving the brunt of violence, poverty, and criminalization. CUAV believes that systemic unemployment and disproportionate interaction with criminal legal and immigration enforcement systems are major issues facing their community, and that these issues produce long standing trauma, barriers to stable housing and healthcare, isolation, violence, and premature death. Their approach is a holistic one and aims to create safety. Their goals are to strengthen the wellness of low- and no-income LGBTQ people surviving domestic violence and hate violence; increase the capacity of low- and no-income LGBTQ survivors of violence and abuse to create healthy relationships and safer lives; and transform the root causes of violence through culture change activities and policy campaigns on issues such as immigration. CUAV is leading a multi-movement coalition against the expansion of the San Francisco Jail.