Comunidad De Trans Y Travestis Trabajadoras Sexuales Dominicana- COTRAVETD

COTRAVETD promotes the social inclusion of transgender sex workers through advocacy, outreach strategies, campaigns to reduce stigma and discrimination, direct health services and programs for the empowerment of sex workers.

COTRAVETD was founded to bring visibility and respond to the human rights violations suffered by sex workers in the Dominican Republic, due to the total lack of visibility, services and justice suffered by this community. COTRAVETD promotes the social inclusion of transgender sex workers through advocacy, outreach strategies, campaigns to reduce stigma and discrimination, direct health services and programs for the empowerment of sex workers with the purpose of knowing and advocating for their rights.

*** En Español***

COTRAVETD se fundó para traer visibilidad y responder a las violaciones de los derechos humanos de las que son víctimas las trabajadoras sexuales en la República Dominicana, debido a la falta total de visibilidad, servicios y justicia que sufre esta comunidad. COTRAVETD promueve la inclusión social de las trabajadoras sexuales migrates trans a través de defensoría, estrategias de visibilización, campañas para reducir el estigma y la discriminación, servicios directos de salud y programas para el empoderamiento de las trabajadoras sexuales con el propósito de que conozcan y aboguen por sus derechos.

Montana Two Spirit Society

The mission of the Montana Two Spirit Society is to advocate, educate and build community among Native and Indigenous peoples by sharing their two spirit histories.

The Montana Two Spirit Society has been working since 2007 and coordinating the Montana Two Spirit Gatherings for the past twenty years. The mission of the Montana Two Spirit Society is to advocate, educate and build community among Native and Indigenous peoples, including LGBTI and allied communities, by sharing their two spirit histories and cultural traditions. Their vision is to reclaim their two spirit traditions and heal past wounds as a way to create healthy Native and Indigenous two spirit communities. They are a volunteer grassroots organization working to build community and organize Native two spirits in Montana and the surrounding region (WA, ID, WY, ND, SD as well as parts of Canada, including Alberta, Manitoba and Saskachewan). Their accomplishments include: hosting International Two Spirit Gathering in 2004 and 2012; organizing a successful Montana Two Spirit Gathering for over 20 years and making it one of the largest in the Pacific Northwest; producing a short video about two-spirit culture and gatherings; conducting various presentations and workshops at national conferences and other Gatherings; attending and supporting similar Gatherings across the country and Canada; marching in Montana LGBT Pride events; and, raising awareness on Montana reservations and the Pacific Northwest Region about two-spirit issues.

This organization is supported through the Funding Queerly Giving Circle, which is housed at Astraea.

Mariposas Sin Fronteras

Mariposas Sin Fronteras was formed in 2011 by LGBTQI people within the immigrant rights movement in Arizona to end the systemic violence against LGBTQI people in detention and to create opportunities for their self-determination.

Mariposas Sin Fronteras was formed in 2011 by LGBTQI people within the immigrant rights movement in Arizona to end the systemic violence against LGBTQI people in detention and to create opportunities for their self-determination. Their work has three main components: direct support for LGBTQI immigrants in and out of immigration detention, campaigns against the criminalization of immigrants and LGBTQI people, and leadership development of formerly detained immigrants. At the local level, they have run campaigns to release individual LGBTQI people from detention and hold ICE accountable when people have faced additional violence in custody. They also organize with the broader immigrant rights and sex workers rights movements to end the detention bed quota, stop collaboration between Tucson police and border patrol during routine stops, and end the criminalization of trans women of color profiled under draconian local anti-prostitution laws. Since they were founded, they have raised over $50,000 in private donations to go towards a revolving bond fund to support LGBTQI people in detention. They have also expanded their arts and cultural organizing, developing creative partnerships with groups like CultureStrike and Vox Urbana to produce original artistic content informed and led by the experiences of LGBTQ people in detention, as well as supporting the leadership of undocumented LGBTQI artists themselves.

Not One More Deportation Campaign/Mijente

The #Not1More Deportation campaign was launched in 2013 to pursue just and humane immigration policies, starting with a stop to deportations.

The #Not1More Deportation campaign was launched in 2013 to pursue just and humane immigration policies, starting with a stop to deportations. In a context that saw a continued rise in state and national anti-immigrant policies along with diminishing possibilities for immigration reform, the campaign viewed criminalization as a central threat and fundamental to true legalization for undocumented people. Originally launched as part of NDLON, the campaign became independent to deepen the links between efforts against mass deportation, mass incarceration and state-sanctioned violence, and serve as a national vehicle for continued intersectional collaboration between community, labor, undocumented and LGBTQ organizations. By 2015 the campaign and its members became a crucial foundation for the forming of Mijente, a national grassroots and online organizing hub for Latinx and Chicanx in the United States. Significant successes include generating national momentum and changing the immigration debate to focus on the human cost of deportation. They catalyzed unlikely alliances across the country, supported the passage of dozens of local and state laws to undermine police-ICE collaboration, supported of campaigns to stop the deportations of hundreds of community members, and generated substantial pressure toward the legal, political and moral arguments that moved the President to announce executive action in November 2014. Over the past year, they significantly increased their collaboration and support of LGBTQ groups and issues, with SONG, Familia and the Transgender Law Center joining their campaign leadership. Last year, they co-hosted the “Queering Immigration Regional Kinship and Strategy Meeting” with SONG in Atlanta to bring people together to strategize organizing against immigration enforcement and detention policies in the South. They also organized a retreat for trans latina women organizers with TLC and Familia and a strategy session for the Not1More LGBTQ Deportation campaign.

Familia: Trans Queer Liberation Movement (Familia TQLM)

Familia: Trans Queer Liberation Movement is a national LGBTQ Latina/o racial justice organization. Familia: TQLM works at the national and local level to achieve the collective liberation of Latina/os by leading an intergenerational movement through grassroots community organizing, advocacy, and education.

Familia: Trans Queer Liberation Movement (Familia: TQLM) is a national LGBTQ Latina/o racial justice organization. Familia: TQLM works at the national and local level to achieve the collective liberation of Latina/os by leading an intergenerational movement through grassroots community organizing, advocacy, and education. The organization was founded in 2014 in Los Angeles, California, and the organization’s current work includes ending the detention and deportation of transgender undocumented immigrants via the Not1More Deportation Campaign, trans and queer liberation work, and family acceptance. Familia: TQLM utilizes a racial justice lens to carry out the work in the Unites States. The organization primarily works with the LGBTQ Latina/o community that has been historically marginalized and not given full access to education, employment, housing, healthcare, and safety in order to lead authentic lives. Many members in the LGBTQ Latina/o community tend to be low-income/poor, undocumented, without healthcare, living with HIV/AIDS, and are being left out of the political process in the country. Familia: TQLM deeply understands that the issues impacting the LGBTQ Latina/o are the same issues impacting the broader people of color communities across the country so the work cannot be siloed. The organization uses a racial justice framework in order to make the connections of the conditions LGBTQ Latina/o are living in with the racist, transphobic, homophobic, patriarchal systems that are creating these same conditions.

This organization is supported through the Funding Queerly Giving Circle, which is housed at Astraea.

Check out our 2018 International Trans Day of Visibility video featuring an interview with Familia TQLM Community Organizer Jennicet Gutiérrez:

Trans Queer Pueblo

Trans Queer Pueblo, formed in 2016 as a merger between Arcoiris Liberation Team and the Arizona Queer Undocumented Immigrant Project, is a grassroots group working for the liberation of trans/queer migrant communities in Phoenix, both in side and outside of detention walls.

Trans Queer Pueblo, formed in 2016 as a merger between Arcoiris Liberation Team and the Arizona Queer Undocumented Immigrant Project, is a grassroots group working for the liberation of trans/queer migrant communities in Phoenix, both in side and outside of detention walls. Their key programs fall in four areas: Economic Justice, which builds the economic resilience of formerly detained people; Community Defense, which organizes and builds leadership of trans women; Health Justice, which facilitates access to primary care services and builds leadership of health promoters; and Family Acceptance, which supports and organizes family members of LGBTQ immigrants to engage in migrant justice work. They have organized successful case-by-case advocacy campaigns to free LGBTQ immigrants from detention. They also contributed to winning access to gender-affirming and migration-affirming municipal IDs through participation in the OnePhoenixID campaign and effectively mobilizing immigrant parents to speak out at school and community forums throughout the city.

Immigrant Youth Coalition (IYC)

The Immigrant Youth Coalition (IYC) is an undocumented and queer/trans youth led organization that mobilizes youth, families and incarcerated people to end the criminalization of immigrants and people of color.

The Immigrant Youth Coalition (IYC) is an undocumented and queer/trans youth led organization that mobilizes youth, families and incarcerated people to end the criminalization of immigrants and people of color. Through story-based strategies and grassroots organizing, IYC brings the struggles of directly impacted communities to the forefront of our movements to create social, cultural and policy change. Their programs and work build power with those directly impacted by approaching leadership development from a framework of human development which translates into their campaigns. IYC ensures that the undocumented and trans communities’ demands are included within the existing formations that are campaigning against immigration enforcement and mass incarceration.

This organization is supported through the Funding Queerly Giving Circle, which is housed at Astraea.

El/La Para Translatinas

El/La works to build a world where transgender Latinas (translatinas) feel they deserve to protect, love and develop themselves.

El/La works to build a world where transgender Latinas (translatinas) feel they deserve to protect, love and develop themselves. By building this base, they support translatinas in protecting themselves against violence, abuse, and illness, and in fully realizing their dreams. El/La is an organization for translatinas that builds collective vision and action to promote their survival and improve their quality of life in the San Francisco Bay Area. Their scope of work includes: (1) HIV Prevention – outreach, education, testing, peer-to-peer counseling, accompaniment, and referrals and accompaniment; (2) Violence Prevention – case management, referrals and accompaniment, and Luchadoras Leadership Development and Translatina Council/Consejo Translatina; and (3) Safe Space and Community – evening drop-in,  family-style celebrations, social networking, expression of spirituality, and life skills groups.

As a result of these programs they in turn go out and educate community members about risks to their health and safety, support each other in identifying barriers to full participation in society, and find resources to overcome those barriers. El/La builds visibility and alliances to respond to transphobic attacks and has worked with over 105 city agencies, service providers, programs and collaboratives in San Francisco, the greater Bay Area and beyond. Their work strengthens translatinas’ ability to critique and respond to the systems of violence they face, and the continuation of anti-violence programs addressing violence against translatinas.

Community United Against Violence, Inc. (CUAV)

CUAV is a 37 year-old community organization. Their current programs seek to build the wellness, leadership, and collective power of low- and no-income LGBTQ people of color who are surviving the brunt of violence, poverty, and criminalization.

CUAV is a 37 year-old community organization. Their current programs seek to build the wellness, leadership, and collective power of low- and no-income LGBTQ people of color who are surviving the brunt of violence, poverty, and criminalization. CUAV believes that systemic unemployment and disproportionate interaction with criminal legal and immigration enforcement systems are major issues facing their community, and that these issues produce long standing trauma, barriers to stable housing and healthcare, isolation, violence, and premature death. Their approach is a holistic one and aims to create safety. Their goals are to strengthen the wellness of low- and no-income LGBTQ people surviving domestic violence and hate violence; increase the capacity of low- and no-income LGBTQ survivors of violence and abuse to create healthy relationships and safer lives; and transform the root causes of violence through culture change activities and policy campaigns on issues such as immigration. CUAV is leading a multi-movement coalition against the expansion of the San Francisco Jail.

Southerners on New Ground (SONG)

Formed in 1993 and led primarily by queer women and people of color in the South, SONG is a movement-building leader.

Formed in 1993 and led primarily by queer women and people of color in the South, SONG is a movement-building leader nationally that works with a strong intersectional racial, gender and economic justice politic. SONG’s Free from Fear campaign strategy is working to politicize, engage, and activate LGBTQ people to lead migrant justice and anti-criminalization campaigns in the South, contributing their leadership, base and LGBTQ analysis. SONG has also contributed to key migrant justice campaigns in the South over the past several years, including active leadership in the Southeast Immigrant Rights Network and the Georgia Not1More campaign.